Eurovélo 3 – Sainte-Catherine-de-Fierbois – Sainte-Maure-de-Touraine – Maillé : goats cheese, dolmens & massacres

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It’s a Sunday in the middle of a heat wave and we’ve chosen a cycling itinerary from our new Tours-Basque Coast book (Eurovélo 3) that we don’t know yet. It goes through Sainte-Maure-de-Touraine, famous for its goats cheese, and Maillé, infamous for being the site of the second largest massacre in World War II after Oradour sur Glane. Unfortunately, my trusty iPhone has had a little accident and I’m going to have to rely on Jean Michel’s camera which has a Lumix lens but is not as easy to handle.

Joan of Arc in front of the Auberge Jeanne d'Arc in Sainte-Catherine-de-Fierbois

Joan of Arc in front of the Auberge Jeanne d’Arc in Sainte-Catherine-de-Fierbois

We park the car in the shade at Sainte-Catherine-de-Fierbois, 8 km north of Saint-Maure and set off on our bikes, stopping almost immediately for coffee at an attractive little auberge called Jeanne d’Arc with a terrace looking onto a statue of Joan of Arc who stayed here, wearing men’s clothing, for two nights in March 1429 on her way to Chinon. Her “voices” also revealed the existence of Charles Martel’s rusty sword behind the altar of Saint Catherine’s chapel which she then adopted as her weapon.

Sainte-Catherine-de-Fierbois church

Sainte-Catherine-de-Fierbois church

We visit the pure flamboyant gothic church next door which replaced the chapel after it was burnt down in 1440. One of the chapels inside the church is dedicated to Saint Catherine and there is another statue of Joan of Arc.

Inside the church you can see the flamboyant gothic door and on the right the stained glass window depicting Joan of Arc

Inside the church you can see the flamboyant gothic door and on the right the stained glass window depicting Joan of Arc

Devotion to Saint Catherine was so popular in the middle of the 16th century that Louis de Rohan, seigneur de Sainte-Maure, was authorized by the king to build walls and moats around the village (they’ve now disappeared) so that it could be elevated to the rank of a town.

A more recent château on the road out of Sainte-Chaterine-de-Fierbois

A more recent château on the road out of Sainte-Chaterine-de-Fierbois

After a fruitless attempt to visit the local château, we ride out of town towards a park and another more recent château but we have no idea what it is.

The covered market taken from the side opposite the town hall

The covered market taken from the side opposite the town hall

We soon arrive at Sainte Maure which has a large square surrounded by several historical buildings. The most impressive is an enormous covered market, 48 metres long, 25 metres wide and 20 metres high. You wonder just how much goat cheese they can sell! It is closed but when we go around the back, we discover an open door and wander inside among the permanent stands which are closed today.

One of the monumental doors on the market hall

One of the monumental doors on the covered market

The two monumental doors were added during restoration in 1672 by Princess Anne de Rohan. Unfortunately, they were damaged during the Revolution in 1798.

Town Hall in Sainte-Maure-de-Touraine

Town Hall in Sainte-Maure-de-Touraine

The town hall with its classical façade looks very majestic next to the local PMU café where the locals are enjoying a Sunday aperitif. Who knows, it might even be open when we pass through again on our way back.

The Belle Image inn

The Belle Image inn – so annoying that the rubbish is displayed so prominently

We stop in front of the 12th century “Belle Image” inn, right on the Camino which accounts for the scallop shell on the façade alongside the motto “good wine and good lodgings at La Belle Image”. It finally closed in 1987 and now houses the public revenue department.

The entrance with the shell indicating the Camino route

The entrance with the shell indicating the Camino route

We cycle down to the ruins of the château built in 990. The 14th century tower is all that remains of the protective walls. After the French revolution the castle housed the local gendarmerie until 1836 when it became a boys’ school until 1968.

The tower and remains of the château in Sainte-Maure-de-Touraine

The tower and remains of the château in Sainte-Maure-de-Touraine

There is one more place to visit before we go – the Virgins’ Chapel and Fountain – which is out of town a bit. As it’s very hot, not to say extremely hot, we don’t want to run the risk of losing our way so we ask at a newly open Portuguese wine and grocery store as I figure they’ll know about the chapel. “It’s up a very steep hill”, they tell us. It’s certainly not as taxing as our 1.6 km in Germany in July, but it still requires major leg power particularly in such intense heat.

The Virgins Chapel

The Virgins Chapel

I flake out at the top while Jean Michel looks around. There is a bench in the shade overlooking the town so we decide to have lunch there so that I can regain my strength.

The micraculous well at the Virgins Chapel

The micraculous well at the Virgins Chapel

The present chapel, inaugurated in 1892 replaces a chapel built in 1760 on the site of a fountain reputed to heal milk ringworm. The chapel is closed so we don’t get to visit the inside. Apparently it’s hardly ever used

The beautifullly restore wash house and market bus sign

The beautifullly restore wash house and market bus sign

As we cycle down the hill, I am able to observe a beautifully restored wash house and take a closer look at a sign that I noticed on the way up when I obviously was not going to stop. A free 22-seat mini-bus called the “carosse du marché” picks up people every Friday from mid-June to mid-September to take them to the produce market. The market must be really enormous!

The only goats we see - note the manger and the goats just visible in the hangar

The only goats we see – note the manger and the goats just visible in the hangar

The next monument on our list is a dolmen or Pierre fondue (melted stone) and is very hard to locate. We eventually come across a very small sign and follow it along an extremely stony path. On the way we see our first herd of goats. Considering how famous the cheese is here, we are surprised not to see more. Some of them are resting out of the hot sun in a large unattractive wrought-iron shelter with a Christmas manger in front.

The dolmen outside Saint-Maure-de-Touraine

The dolmen outside Saint-Maure-de-Touraine

The dolmen is a bit of a disappointment, but then, dolmens usually are. The 1.7 metre high megalith, made of Turonian limestone and sandstone, is the remnant of a covered walkway: an aisle formed by a double row of upright stones, covered with slabs. It is a Neolithic gravesite with its opening facing the rising sun. It was erected during the “new stone age” (about 5,000 to 6,000 BC) when hunters and gatherers became farmers and breeders. I try to imagine its significance but the broiling sun makes it difficult and I let Jean Michel go and take the photo close up.

The seemingly closed war museum in Maillé

The seemingly closed war museum in Maillé

Another dolmen, a menhir this time, is shown on our cycling map but we vote only to visit it if it’s on our route. It isn’t, so we push on to Maillé. We see the war museum on our right but it looks completely closed. What a disappointment. We approach the gate and discover it is open. A very friendly woman appears, expressing surprise at our arrival. “I didn’t expect anyone to come today”, she says, “because of the heat.” Only mad dogs and Englishmen, I think.

Reconstructed houses in Maillé

Reconstructed houses in Maillé

The Maillé Massacre, as it is called, took place on 25th August 1944, the day that Paris was liberated, as revenge on local Resistance activities. The German forces killed 124 out of the 500 inhabitants of the village which was then burnt to the ground. Only 8 houses out of 60 remained. The village was reconstructed. It was mainly thanks to the financial support of an American Francophile couple, the Hales, that the orphaned children and remaining adults were able to get on with their lives.

A temporary exhibition consists of photos of inhabitants who were about 10 years old when the massacre took place, with recorded quotations of their experience on a video screen. We leave feeling very subdued. In the meantime, the friendly lady has put two of our water bottles in the freezer. The cold water is much appreciated as there is not a single café or shop open.

The Vienne River in Nouatre. Magnificent bignomias on the left

The Vienne River in Nouatre. Magnificent bignonias on the left

We continue to Nouâtre, our destination for today, built on the Vienne River. We eventually locate Château de la Motte, but there isn’t much to see. It has been turned haphazardly, it seems, into individual apartments.

The somewhat disappointing Château de la Motte

The somewhat disappointing Château de la Motte

Back in Maillé, we visit the outside of the little 11th century church with its Romanesque porch and external staircase. Inside there is a memorial to the victims of the massacre but it is only open during heritage weekend in September. I later learn my friend Susan from Days on the Claise has written a post about Maillé.

The 11th century church with its Romanesque porch in Maillé

The 11th century church with its Romanesque porch in Maillé

We arrive back in Sainte-Catherine-de-Fierbois exhausted but get a kick out of photographing the local recipes illustrated on billboards around the main square. I hear an older woman and her adult son clucking about the recipes but can’t catch their words. I don’t care! I’m going to try that Goat Cheese Tart!

Goat cheese tart recipe

Goat cheese tart recipe

 

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7 Responses to Eurovélo 3 – Sainte-Catherine-de-Fierbois – Sainte-Maure-de-Touraine – Maillé : goats cheese, dolmens & massacres

  1. Susan Walter says:

    I haven’t looked it up to check but I would be surprised if Maillé was the largest massacre in WWII. My recollection is that it was the second largest in France in terms of numbers killed, after Oradour sur Glane. I’ll check. There is a nice memorial in the local cemetery at Maillé — simple and evocative, basically a list of names on a very big stone, shocking because of the numbers and the multiple members of the same families. Also Paule Richon’s carved stone monument on the turn off to Maillé from the main road.

    Most of the goat herds are kept indoors, to make it easier to control intestinal worms. That’s why you don’t see them much.

    That’s a stonkingly good dolmen! I assume from your description it is actually a fogou, not a tomb. I’ve never visited it, better put it on the list.

    BTW, you didn’t miss anything by not getting in to the chapel at Ste Maure.

  2. Rosemary Kneipp says:

    Hi, sorry about that – “second” is missing. I’ve added it and said second to Oradour. Thanks for pointing it out.
    As we took a smaller road becausse of cycling, we didn’t see Paule Richon’s carved stone monument which is a pity.

    The information about the dolmen de Boumiers comes from here: http://www.sainte-maure-de-touraine.fr/editorial.php?id=123.

    I’m glad we didn’t miss anything by not getting in the chapel. I don’t really want to cycle up that hill again!

  3. Carolyn says:

    Jean-Michel’s camera worked a treat, Rosemary! Your photos are fantastic.

    I love the detail on the church – you are right, it really is quite flamboyant.

  4. Helen says:

    235j/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

    So many wonderful buildings have witnessed man’s inability for peace. A fantastic cycle. I love goat’s cheese tarts, but the cheese is really just too expensive to make them here.
    Helen recently posted…Fingal Head – New South WalesMy Profile

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