Flowers of Tasmania

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As you already know, I love flowers and gardens. We have just spent twelve days in Tasmania and I just loved the spring blossoms, particularly the “natives”, including one of my great favourites – the wattle, Australia’s national flower – of which there are many varieties. The flowers below are not necessarily indigenous to Tasmania or to Australia, for that matter, but we saw them everywhere. Perhaps some of my readers can identify the species that I’m not sure of below.

Wattle 1

Wattle 2 – Golden Wattle?

Wattle 3

Bush with white flowers and new red leaves

Magnolia

Tasmanian Lavendar

Kangaroo Paw, endemic to Western Australia

Bottle Brush

Echium

 

 

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6 Responses to Flowers of Tasmania

  1. Susan Walter says:

    The third wattle is probably Cootamundra Wattle Acacia baileyana. The others I couldn’t ID without a key or field guide these days. The bush with the white flowers and new red leaves is probably Photinia.

  2. Jill says:

    Im always so more focused on France that I forget how beautiful our Australian natives are! Lovely shots Fraussie.

    • Fraussie says:

      When I first left Australia, I loved all the European vegetation and when I came back here for the first time after 3 years, I couldn’t get over how lovely it is here. It was as though being somewhere else made me appreciate it more.

  3. Barb Hall says:

    Hi to the travellers –
    Think the ‘bush with red leaves and flowers’ is photinia. The red leaves are the new growth and turn green – make great hedges but not sure if it is native to Australia.

    • Fraussie says:

      Hi Barb. Just checkedout photinia in Wikipedia which says that the natural range of these species is restricted to warm temperate Asia, from the Himalaya east to Japan and south to India and Thailand but they have been widely cultivated throughout the world as ornamentals for their white flowers and red fruits

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