First Day in NYC – Ground Zero, Statue of Liberty & Times Square

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We are in New York. The last time I was here was in 1979. For Jean Michel, it’s the first time. We are visiting my two grown-up children, Leonardo and Black Cat, who live and work in NYC. We have no agenda. “We’re in your hands”, I say. “I want you to show me your New York”.

Jean Michel in News eating his first bagel

Jean Michel in News eating his first bagel

The first day of our stay is a Friday so both the kids are at work. We want to see the Statue of Liberty which is French of course. There is another one in Paris. So after going downstairs to News, the local café, and having a coffee and bagel (which we don’t think is anything special), we walk from where we are staying  in Union Square, which is ideally located in the lower part of Manhattan to the free Staten Island ferry on the southern tip of the island.

fire_escapes

The sun is shining, it’s very warm, it’s 9 o’clock in the morning and New York feels much better than it did the first time I was here. The first thing that strikes me are all the fire escapes on the front of buildings that we all know from West Side Story. Black Cat later explains their origin.

Initially there were only inside staircases but in 1860, two separate fires destroyed two crowded tenement houses. In both cases, fire and smoke blocked the sole stairway, trapping those on the upper floors and claiming a total of 30 lives. Following the twin tragedies, public outcry forced the legislature to pass a law requiring fire escapes on all newly constructed tenement houses, followed by retroactive installation on all existing tenements  In 1871, the requirement for fire escapes was expanded to include hotels, boarding houses, office buildings and factories.

This is just one of the many New York University buildings in West Village - I love the Coca-Cola truck

This is just one of the many New York University buildings in West Village – I love the Coca-Cola truck

We go past NYU, New York University, which occupies several buildings in the area. We come across several typiically American delivery trucks.

The triumphal arch in Washington Square

The triumphal arch in Washington Square

We walk through Washington Square which I later learn is Black Cat’s favourite park, very near to where she has a flat share with two Americans. It even has a triumphal arch built in 1892 in Washington Square Park to celebrate the centennial of George Washington’s inauguration as President of the United States in 1789. Through it we can see the One World Trade Centre.

Two contrasting skyscrapers - the new One World Trade Center and one of the "wedding cake" skyscrapers from the 1930s

Two contrasting skyscrapers – the new One World Trade Center and one of the “wedding cake” skyscrapers from the 1930s

We walk down Broadway until we reach Ground Zero. I have never watched any footage although I listened to the live reports on the car radio in Black Cat’s company in Paris on 11 September 2001. I was taking her home from school at the time.  I was afraid that if I saw the videos I might never take a plane again. Today is 9 September 2016 and a man in a tourist booth tells me there is a parade at midday.

One of the two memorials at Ground Zero

One of the two memorials at Ground Zero showing the black pit in the centre

I have no idea what to expect at Ground Zero. We approach the first memorial, a black marble hole in the ground with water running down all four sides. Around the edge are the names of the 3000 people who died immediately or in the aftermath of the attacks. Roses and other small bouquets of flowers are scattered around the names.

The second memorial with a bouquet from the French firemen

The second memorial with a bouquet from the French firemen

I am overcome with emotion. It reminds me of when I saw one of the remaining pieces of the Berlin Wall near Checkpoinit Charly. There is a sort of hush around me and I see I am not the only person to be moved. There are people taking selfies which I find it difficult to imagine. We move to the second, identical memorial. Each corresponds to the surface area taken up by the fallen towers.

One of the police bands practising for the parade

One of the police bands practising for the parade

Nearby we hear bagpipes playing.  We are relieved to have a little light entertainment. It turns out to be various police bands from throughout the country practicing for the midday parade organised by the New York Police Department to honor its 23 officers who died at the World Trade Center.

Wall Street

Wall Street

After listening to various bands we think we’ll skip the parade but by the time we visited Wall Street nearby, it’s midday and we watch the beginning.

The parade about to begin next to Trinity Church on Broadway

The parade about to begin next to Trinity Church on Broadway

We continue our walk to the Staten Island Ferry. It’s excessively hot (we even buy hats) and the crowd is enormous but so is the ferry and, as it turns out, there’s plenty of room to get a good view of the Statue of Liberty as we go past. By now, the sky is somewhat overcast, to my disappointment. It’s just after 1 pm.

The Statue of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty

After a 25-minute ride, we leave the ferry (we have no choice) and have a coffee in the terminal before boarding the next ferry back. We have been told there isn’t much to see on Staten Island and by now our feet are beginning to feel the miles we’ve walked today. The ferry back is much more crowded as it’s now 2.30 pm.

Manhattan as we approach it from Staten Ferry

Manhattan as we approach it from Staten Ferry

We take the underground back to Union Square after buying a 7-day pass each. The underground station is horrendously hot and the air-conditioned train is cold by contrast. We are glad to be above ground again!

Entrance to the underground

Entrance to the underground

We have an appointment with Black Cat at her office in Times Square at 5 pm so are pleased to be able to relax a little at home before going out again. The construction site opposite, which started at 7 am, stops at 4 pm, which is a relief.

The rooftop of Black Cat's building

The rooftop of Black Cat’s building

Black Cat works in the most amazing building, with a help-yourself bar, lounge chairs and an eating area on each floor but the rooftop is the best! While we are there, we see a young lady stretched out on a sofa with her laptop propped up in front of her. It’s a whole other world! Black Cat takes us down to her office and introduces us to her workmates and boss. They are very relaxed and friendly. I’m even given a red publicity hoodie.

Times Square which I find very aggressive

Times Square which I find very aggressive

After walking through Times Square with its agressive neon signs, we cross Bryant Park and sit in garden chairs and listen to a guitar player. Black Cat tells us that she came to Shakespeare in the Park here during the summer. What a wonderful setting!

Bryant Park - an oasis of green surrounded by skyscrapers

Bryant Park – an oasis of green surrounded by skyscrapers

She then takes us up to the top of the 230 Fifth rooftop bar on 5th Avenue to see New York at night. There are crowds of people but we are still able to appreciate the amazing view. We don’t stop for a drink – we could be here forever!

The view from the 230 Fifth rooftop bar

The view from the 230 Fifth rooftop bar

We finish the evening at Leonardo’s flat-share on Lexington Avenue in Kips Bays where he has cooked us some excellent steaks. We start with a cocktail which seems appropriate in Manhattan. He takes onto his balcony which is away from the street and we are surrounded with the constant hum of air-conditioners.

By the time we walk back to Union Square, we are ready for bed! The weekend promises to be full on.

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4 Responses to First Day in NYC – Ground Zero, Statue of Liberty & Times Square

  1. The poignancy of the memorial site really strikes me anytime I’ve seen it in photos and video. On 9/11 this year, the annual national fire fighters memorial service happened to be on that same day, so that date in history was invoked by more than one speaker.

    I can’t recall knowing about that arch in Washington Square.
    William Kendall recently posted…A Summer Day At Rideau HallMy Profile

    • Rosemary Kneipp says:

      Yes, it is very poignant. I didn’t know about the annual national fire fighters memorial service but it explains the French fire fighters’ bouquet.

      The Washington Square Arch is a marble triumphal arch built in 1892 in Washington Square Park in the Greenwich Village neighborhood of Lower Manhattan in New York City. It celebrates the centennial of George Washington’s inauguration as President of the United States in 1789. I shall add that information to the post.

  2. Helen says:

    It has been lovely to revisit the ‘famous’ sites of NY through your eyes. In 2012, we stayed in a hotel that immediately overlooked Ground Zero. We often saw aircraft flying behind the skyscrapers cross the open space. It gave one such an eerie feeling and it was impossible too comprehend the terror and horror of the day.
    Helen recently posted…Columbia River and Larch MountainMy Profile

  3. Pingback: A City Break in Angoulême | Aussie in France

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