A City Break in Angoulême

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We haven’t had a break since we went to New York in September what with having to fill the coffers again after our three months’ holiday in 2016, digging the trenches for the automatic watering system and Jean Michel’s varicose vein operation but he’s now up and about again so we’ve chosen to spend two nights in Angoulême, which is 280 K south-west of Blois. Sunny weather is predicted with temperatures around 11 or 12°C during the day.

L'Embarcadère where we had lunch

L’Embarcadère in Rochecorbon

By the time we leave it’s nearly midday so we plan lunch at L’Embarcadère in the troglodyte village of Rochecorbon, not far from Vouvray. We’ve been there twice before and enjoyed it. I book a table but needn’t have bothered as there are very few people. The February “ski” holidays are in full swing which means that local tourism is down. We have a pleasant lunch with real chip potatoes, always a good way to start a little holiday.

Our Appart-City hotel

Our Appart-City hotel

After another couple of hours’ driving, we arrive at our apartment-hotel in Angoulême at 5.30 pm. We nearly had to give up the idea of Angoulême altogether as the local hotels were either too expensive or too “modern” with garish coulours that I could never have slept with. Angoulême is the “comic book” capital of France and a lot of the interior decor caters for the annual comic book festival held at the end of January each year.

The old abbey of which are hotel is one of the remaining buildings

The old abbey of which are hotel is one of the remaining buildings

In the end, we decided to try Appart’City at the bottom of the hill leading up to the old town. The building, which we later discover is an old abbey, is not very attractive, but the one-bedroom apartment, with a separate kitchen and bathroom, is excellent value for money at 70 euro a night (optional 8.50 for breakfast). It’s clean, with white walls and sober colours, the bed is comfortable, the kitchen has everything we need, even a mini dishwasher, it has a decent shower and it’s not noisy. Excellent choice.

The Charente seen as we walk up the hill to the old town

The Charente seen as we walk up the hill to the old town

After a short rest, we take the zigzag path up to the old town, with sweeping views across the newer part of the city which has a total population of 42,000, much less than I would have imagined, but “greater Angoulême”, created in 1989, has 141,000 inhabitants. The Charente River is below us.

A comic-strip wall in Angoulême

A comic-strip wall in Angoulême

We wander through the old town which is surrounded by ramparts. All the streets have paving stones. We find it quite animated with many shops and bars. The comic book influence is everywhere but we are also surprisesd by the large number of beautiful old façades.

Our first glimpse of the cathedral town and dome

Our first glimpse of the cathedral town and dome

The sun is starting to set over Angoulême’s main monument, the Romanesque Cathedral of Saint Peter, built in the 12th century and renovated several times since then.

Saint Peter's Cathedral

Saint Peter’s Cathedral

After a glass of wine on one of the town’s many squares we walk back down to our hotel, taking the direct route this time. On the way, I am intrigued by a building which has a comic strip projected onto it, one panel at a time. Not being an adult comic fan, I don’t know who the characters are, but the result is very effective and there are several sequences.

Comic strips at night on an otherwise blank wall

Comic strips at night on an otherwise blank wall

We are perfectly happy with a platter of bread and cheese with a good glass of red wine in our little apartment.

The law courts with a combination of old and new

The law courts with a local producer to remind us that we are in Limousin, famous for its beef

Next day is sunny and not too cold. We walk up the hill again and have a cappuccino at the François I opposite the impressive-looking Law Courts built in 1826 in the neo-Classical style by the architect Paul Abadie who seems to have been involved in the construction or reconstruction of most of the main buildings in Angoulême.

Two of the beautiful façades in the centre of Angoulême

Two of the beautifully sculpted façades in the centre of Angoulême

We continue our walk through the city in search of the “last haberdasher’s shop” in Angoulême. This is a dying race in most towns in France these days. A little chat with the owner confirms this. She will be retiring in three years’ time. The shop belonged to her parents. She explains why the shank buttons keep coming off my jacket. It’s their concave shape, it seems, so I buy some straight ones.

Roman-tiled rooftops and the rcently built church of Sainte Aubézine

Roman-tiled rooftops and the recently built neo-gothic church of Sainte Aubézine completed in 1960

Our path takes us around the ramparts until we reach the cathedral whose dome and bell-tower we keep seeing in the distance.

Walking along the ramparts towards the cathedral. You can see the dome.

Walking along the ramparts towards the cathedral. You can see the dome.

The inside is somewhat disappointing, mainly due to all the reconstructions that have taken place.

The back of the cathedral, which offers the best view

The back of the cathedral showing all the different influences

By now it’s nearly lunchtime so we wander back to Le Saint André which I reserved when we went past earlier. As n° 1 out of 176 restaurants on TripAdvisor, I thought I should. It quickly fills up. At 14.90 euro for a three-course set menu, it’s good value for money. The leek and conté cheese tart is excellent, the kefta meatballs aren’t bad and the apple and pineapple tatin tart is very good. Jean Michel has the pork mignon and moka and praliné sponge roll. He says they are simple but refined. The restaurant is obviously a favourite with the locals and the two owners explain the menu and chat with their regular patrons.

Church of Saint André after which the restaurant is named

Church of Saint André after which the restaurant is named

After coffee, we walk back down the hill for an after-lunch siesta. We would like to visit the paper museum across the other side of the Charente in the afternoon. There are many old water mills and reconverted factories along the banks of the river, including the international comic book centre in a series of old wine and spirit stores.

The Paper Museum on the banks of the Charente, next to the Ecole Supérieure européenne de l'image

The Paper Museum on the banks of the Charente, next to the Ecole Supérieure européenne de l’image

Only the bottom floor of the paper museum is open. The museography is not very good and gives little idea of what was once a huge industry.

The Comic Book Centre

The Comic Book Centre

We take a different path up to the old town. Jean Michel takes me straight to a Salon de thé he noticed during our morning walk – Parfums Sucrés Daniel Hue. The cakes and tea are both good.

Place du Minage

Place du Minage

We finish our rampart walk in the other direction and return to our hotel from the other side as the sun sets over the city. We settle for yoghurt and salad in our apartment. We rarely eat out at night when we’re on holidays. You can have too much of a good thing!

Lower Angoulême with our Appart'City hotel in the middle

Lower Angoulême with our Appart’City hotel in the middle

Next day, it’s cold and overcast. We chose our two days well! More photos below if you’d like to have a more complete idea of Angoulême.

The war monument

The war monument

Another typical building in the historical part of the city

Another typical building in the historical part of the city

Our tearoom

Our tearoom

The castle which is now the town hall

The castle which is now the town hall

More sculpted façades

More sculpted façades

A modern façade looking up towards the old town

A modern façade looking up towards the old town – our hotel is on the right

A comic book statue

A comic book statue

Looking down at our Appart'City hotel and the Charente

Looking down at our Appart’City hotel and the Charente

Le Saint André where we had an enjoyable lunch

Le Saint André where we had an enjoyable lunch

The bell-tower of the cathedral

The bell-tower of the cathedral

Joan of Arc in Angoulême Cathedral. They are all different!

Joan of Arc in Angoulême Cathedral. They are all different!

The cathedral spires are on the left and xxx on the right

The cathedral spires are on the left and Notre Dame d’Obézine on the right

The church of Saint Martial in the centre of the city

The church of Saint Martial in the centre of the city where we had our apéritif

Hôtel Saint Simon built in

Hôtel Saint Simon built by the Dussouchet family in 1530 to 1550

 

Walking up the hill to the walled city

Walking up the hill to the walled city

 

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8 Responses to A City Break in Angoulême

  1. I find the church architecture very fascinating, and that war memorial is impressive too. A pleasant area! From the look of the comic panels, I imagine a lot of the trade there are in the European books, which would be out of my experience.
    William Kendall recently posted…Majesty On IceMy Profile

  2. Helen says:

    I had not heard of the City of Angouleme, until your posts, but it is definitely worthy of a visit to to enjoy its mixed architecture, comic strips and history. Fantastic that you added more pics at the conclusion of our writing. Wonderful captures.
    Helen recently posted…Walking in JanuaryMy Profile

  3. Susan Walter says:

    Nice overview of the city. We’ve never stopped there, only passed by on the way to other places. I know it’s worth visiting but somehow we never have.

    • Rosemary Kneipp says:

      We were glad to have our hotel within walking distance of the centre but Jean Michel said he noticed underground parking in the old town.

    • Lesley says:

      Yes we have been around the Ring Road many times! Pehaps one day we should stop – but not when the bikes are racing around the town.

  4. What a beautiful city and one I’d love to explore myself on our next trip to France. So glad to have stumbled across this lovely place on your blog.
    Lyn @ A Hole in my Shoe recently posted…Covered Passages in ParisMy Profile

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