Cycling along the Danube – a Renaissance Festival in Neuburg, Bavaria

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In one of our guidebooks, there was mention of an annual Renaissance festival in Neuburg,, west of Regensburg, but I could find no information in English or French about dates on the Internet so we thought we should go there on a Saturday or Sunday just in case it was on.

Neuburger Schlossfest

Neuburger Schlossfest

When we cycled into the town on Saturday afternoon, we initially saw no sign of any festivities but while having a cold drink at a gasthof near the river, I saw a young man leaning over the parapet of the bridge above me dressed in a floppy velvet hat so I knew something was going on. It turns out the festival, which is actually called the Neuburger Schlossfest, is held on the last weekend of June and first weekend of July.

The matching couple at the town gate

The matching couple at the town gate

At the entrance to the walled town, you pay 4 euro and are given a badge.  The thing that appealed to me most is that all the locals obviously join in every year and people of every age are dressed in Renaissance costumes, from the most sophisticated to the simplest and enjoying themselves immensely.

The elegant couple

The elegant couple with full accessories

Some go all the way, with matching bodkins and tankards strapped to their waists.

Typical street scene

Typical street scene

There are stalls selling all sorts of Renaissance produce and products and lots of food and drink stalls of course.

The three friends

The three friends

No one is the slightest bit shy of having their photograph taken!

Merry go round

Merry go round

There is even a mediaeval merry-go-round that is popular with both the parents and children.

My favourite man's costume

My favourite man’s costume

I just loved this man’s velvet costume. What detail! But I didn’t quite dare to dash round in front of him for the photo.

The gypsy dancers

The gypsy dancers

Various performers were to be seen on the streets. These gypsy dancers had their own music.

The blue drummers

The blue marchers

There were groups in similar costumes though we didn’t know their significance of course.

Yellow drums

Yellow drums

Flag waving

Flag waving

The giant tankard

The giant tankard

From what I could gather, this tankard was passed around from one person to another!

The hat stall

The hat stall

There were also a lot of costume stalls. I’d love to have bought one!

Father and son

Father and son

 

OTHER POSTS ABOUT CYCLING IN GERMANY

Cycling in Germany – Tips & Tricks
Cycling in Germany #1 – Kobern-Gondorf on the Moselle
Cycling in Germany #2 – Rhine from Saint Goar to Lorch
Cycling in Germany #3 – Cochem to Zell on the Moselle
Cycling in Germany #4 – Koblenz where the Moselle meets the Rhine
Cycling in Germany #5 – Bad Schaugen to Pirna along the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #6 – Bastei Rocks, Honigen and over the border to Czech Republic 
Cycling in Germany #7 – Dresden: accommodation & car trouble and Baroque Treasure  
Cycling in Germany #8 – Dresden Neustadt: Kunsthof Passage, Pfund’s Molkerei, a broom shop & trompe l’oeil
Cycling in Germany #9 – Country roads around Niderlommatzsch on the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #10 – Meissen on the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #11 – Martin Luther Country: Torgau on the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #12 – Martin Luther Country: Wittenberg on the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #13 – Wörlitz Gardens and the beginning of neo-classicism in Germany
Cycling in Germany #14 – Shades of Gaudi on the Elbe: Hundertwasser
Cycling in Germany – Turgermünde, the prettiest village on the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #16 – Celle & Bremen
Cycling in Germany #17 – Windmills & Dykes
Cycling in Germany #18 – Painted façades from Hann. Münden to Höxter
Cycling in Germany #19 – Bernkastel on the Moselle: a hidden treasure
Cycling in Germany #20 – Trier & the Binoculars Scare
 
Cycling along the Danube – A Renaissance festival in Neuburg, Bavaria
Cycling along the Danube – Watch out for trains!
Cycling along the Danube – Regensburg & Altmuhle
Cycling along the Danube –  The Weltenburg Narrows
Cycling along the Danube – from its source to Ehingen
Cycling along the Danube – Ehingen to Ulm
Cycling along the Danube – Singmarigen to Beuron
Cycling along the Danube – Binzwangen to Mengen including  Zwiefalten
Eurovelo 6 – Cycling around Lake Constance
Eurovelo 6 – Moos to Stein am Rhein and Steckborn on Lake Constance
Heading home to France after a month’s cycling holiday

 

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35 Responses to Cycling along the Danube – a Renaissance Festival in Neuburg, Bavaria

  1. Susan Walter says:

    Fantastic! This sort of thing only works if people take it seriously and take care to dress authentically. I only spotted a couple of people ‘doing a plastic’ as cheating with modern near enough is good enough items of attire is known (eg the kid in the last photo is wearing modern sandals — in this case I can’t blame the parents, as equipping him every year with a new outfit would cost a fortune. Good on them for getting him involved). I’m amused by the hairy legged march leader who’s rolled his very authentic hose down — they are probably wool, and I’m surprised more people weren’t shedding bits of costume. I’m amazed and delighted here in Preuilly at how many members of the community relish wandering around town in Renaissance or Medieval gear (mostly hired from the costumier at Montrésor I think) when the occasion demands.

    • Rosemary Kneipp says:

      I, too, was surprised that they had all kept their costumes. It was really burning hot in the sun. I was surprised that so many of the kids and young men were in costume. And they all wore it with such ease. I doubt if these costumes were rented – the number was staggering!

  2. Femme Francophile says:

    What an amazing experience.

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