Cyclng in Germany #15 – Turgermünde, the prettiest village on the Elbe

Print pagePDF pageEmail page

After Magdeburg and the Green Citadel, we continue on to our next location in the little village of Dahlenstedt near Stendal, where we are to spend 3 nights, including a rest day. We first heard of this little town from guests who came to stay at Closerie Falaiseau last year. Henri Beyle, the author of Le Rouge et le Noir took the pseudonym of Stendhal, in hommage of his great passion for Wilhelmina de Grisheim in 1807 and 1808.

Pension Kunsthof with our door on the far right

Pension Kunsthof with our door on the far right

When we arrive, it is blazing hot and Kunsthof Pension with its shady trees is very inviting. Several old restored red brick farmhouse buildings form a grass-covered inner courtyard. Our large room has a kitchen corner, with a sink and electric jug. My heart sinks when I see that only the windows on one side have proper curtains. On the other side, there is a flimsy white curtain on the glass door and a window with no curtains at all. As it turns out, the ivy-covered wall opposite keeps out the 4 am sunlight.

St Jacob''s Gothic cathedral in Stendal with the rathaus in front

St Jacob”s Gothic cathedral in Stendal with the rathaus in front

It’s too hot to even think about cycling, it’s Sunday and we’ve forgotten to buy something to eat so we drive into Stendal for dinner. We’re relieved we didn’t choose a hotel there! The only landmarks are a large church with roadworks in front and the Uengling Gate, a red-brick tower regarded as one of the most splendid late medieval town gates in northern Germany.

The Uengling Gate, reputedly built by masterbuilder Steffen Boxtehude ca. 1450 to 1460 is regarded as one of the most splendid late medieval town gates in northern Germany.

The Uengling Gate, reputedly built by masterbuilder Steffen Boxtehude ca. 1450 to 1460

We can choose between Asian, Italian and a steakhouse. Surprisingly, the waitress speaks English and we order a glass of rosé and an entrecôte and chips with side salad. The entrecôte is very thick and served in a red-hot pan.

The breakfast room at Kunsthof Pension

The breakfast room at Kunsthof Pension

We sleep well, despite the paving stones outside our window that make the passing trucks and cars sound like a thundering train and have a good breakfast in a very pleasant room with large windows overlooking the courtyard. We are the only guests.

The view from the breakfast room

The view from the breakfast room

It’s very overcast and the weather report says it will rain in the afternoon so we drive to Turgermünde and park near the bike path, leaving our visit of the town until our return.

Bird observatory along the bike path

Bird observatory along the bike path

At this part of its course, the Elbe divides into several branches, making it perfect for wildlife. We stop at a bird observatory and take our binoculars up.

The view from the bird observatory

The view from the bird observatory

We also see stork nests along the way which reminds us of the Danube last year.

The ferry crossing

The ferry crossing

At Grieben, we find a biergarten full of other cyclists sitting down to lunch at 11.30 am which is a little early for us. We have a not-very-good (and expensive) cappuccino instead. After crossing on the ferry near Ferchland, we go north to Jerichow, a very dull little town.

Kaffee Behrens in Jerichow

Kaffee Behrens in Jerichow

By then, we’re hungry so we choose not to eat at the imbiss (Turkish snack bar) but, encouraged by the number of bikes outside, at Kaffee Behrens, built in 1763. It turns out they belong to the local soaks!

The lunch menu cards at Kaffee Behrens

The lunch menu cards at Kaffee Behrens

The owner comes over with a set of menu cards which he flicks open and places in a hemisphere on the table. Our schweinfilet and pfifferlings (pork fillet and chanterelle mushrooms) are a good choice.

Höllanderwindmühle in Jerichow

Höllanderwindmühle in Jerichow

Afterwards we visit the local windmill (there are so few places to see that we follow up every lead).

Kloster Jerichow, a Romanesque abbey

Kloster Jerichow, a Romanesque abbey

We also check out the red-brick Romanesque kloster which is on the Compostela route. Unfortunately, it’s closed.

 

First view of Tangermünde

First view of Tangermünde

After cycling a total of forty-five kilometers we arrive back at Tungermünde and I’m very saddle sore!

Shop façade in Tangermünde

Shop façade in Tangermünde

And here, to our immense surprise, we discover that Tangermünde is the prettiest village we have seen on the Elbe! This charming little mediaeval Hanseatic town is hardly mentionedin our guidebooks and there is hardly a tourist in sight.

Church and restaurant

St Stephan’s Church and Exempel Gastuben

We have kaffee and kuchen at the first café we come to. Jean Michel insists on having the only two desserts on the menu (I later see they have large cakes inside). The Petit Feodora is fine – a rather rich fudge-like cake but the Süsser Klump, a regional speciality, does not appeal to me at all.

Klump, the local speciality

Süsser Klump, the local speciality

It has some sort of thick dumplings floating in thin rhubarb soup. Jean Michel valiantly eats half of it along with half the Feodora.

Scboolroom inside the Exempel Gastuben

Scboolroom inside the Exempel Gastuben

The café-restaurant turns out to be an old school with the original classroom set-up (or so I understand).

Painted gallery in St Stephan's

Painted gallery in St Stephan’s

We visit the red-brick church of St Stephan’s with its painted gallery. The church was completely rebuilt after being destroyed by fire in 1617.

Typical painted arch

Typical painted arched doorway

But what we really like are the beautiful arched doorways on the half-timbered houses.

The Rathaus with its complex gothic architecture

The Rathaus with its complex gothic architecture

The rathaus, built in the 1430s, with its gothic and Romanesque structural elements, is also very striking. The façade has three staggered gables each with a miniature spire. reminiscent of the gothic architecture on cathedral exteriors.

The town gate

The town gate

The impressive entrance to the town, with its round tower, has the same type of features, including the off-white contrast on red brick.

View of the Elb from Tangermünde

View of the Elb from Tangermünde

The Schloss Hotel in the ramparts has a little garden behind it with a view of the Elb so we cycle back along the river to the car, having managed to escape the rain altogether. What a wonderful day!

OTHER POSTS ABOUT CYCLING IN GERMANY

Cycling in Germany – Tips & Tricks
Cycling in Germany #1 – Kobern-Gondorf on the Moselle
Cycling in Germany #2 – Rhine from Saint Goar to Lorch
Cycling in Germany #3 – Cochem to Zell on the Moselle
Cycling in Germany #4 – Koblenz where the Moselle meets the Rhine
Cycling in Germany #5 – Bad Schaugen to Pirna along the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #6 – Bastei Rocks, Honigen and over the border to Czech Republic 
Cycling in Germany #7 – Dresden: accommodation & car trouble and Baroque Treasure  
Cycling in Germany #8 – Dresden Neustadt: Kunsthof Passage, Pfund’s Molkerei, a broom shop & trompe l’oeil
Cycling in Germany #9 – Country roads around Niderlommatzsch on the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #10 – Meissen on the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #11 – Martin Luther Country: Torgau on the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #12 – Martin Luther Country: Wittenberg on the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #13 – Wörlitz Gardens and the beginning of neo-classicism in Germany
Cycling in Germany #14 – Shades of Gaudi on the Elbe: Hundertwasser
Cycling in Germany – Turgermünde, the prettiest village on the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #16 – Celle & Bremen
Cycling in Germany #17 – Windmills & Dykes
Cycling in Germany #18 – Painted façades from Hann. Münden to Höxter
Cycling in Germany #19 – Bernkastel on the Moselle: a hidden treasure
Cycling in Germany #20 – Trier & the Binoculars Scare
 
Cycling along the Danube – A Renaissance festival in Neuburg, Bavaria
Cycling along the Danube – Watch out for trains!
Cycling along the Danube – Regensburg & Altmuhle
Cycling along the Danube –  The Weltenburg Narrows
Cycling along the Danube – from its source to Ehingen
Cycling along the Danube – Ehingen to Ulm
Cycling along the Danube – Singmarigen to Beuron
Cycling along the Danube – Binzwangen to Mengen including  Zwiefalten
Eurovelo 6 – Cycling around Lake Constance
Eurovelo 6 – Moos to Stein am Rhein and Steckborn on Lake Constance
Heading home to France after a month’s cycling holiday
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
This entry was posted in Accommodation, Architecture, Cycling, Germany and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink.

44 Responses to Cyclng in Germany #15 – Turgermünde, the prettiest village on the Elbe

  1. karlfest says:

    Looks fantastic. The photos are very sharp too, is that the new phone?

  2. Amazing shots. The rathaus in particular is spectacular.

    • Rosemary Kneipp says:

      Yes, we had never seen anything like it before. There are public benches all around it and we notice many of the locals such sitting there, looking at it.

  3. Anda says:

    Wow, this looks really beautiful! As for the food, I am surprised that you couldn’t find any good deserts there. They are about the only good thing of the German cuisine…

    • Rosemary Kneipp says:

      Really? I have been very disappointed in German cakes and desserts. We’ve been finding quite good food!

  4. Susan Walter says:

    What an interesting if mixed day! I love the view from the breakfast room.

    We saw a documentary series by Jonathan Meades on the architecture of the Hanseatic League a few years ago. It was excellent and enlightening. You probably haven’t encountered Jonathan Meades — he’s an English television documentary maker focusing on culture with a highly individual style, lives in France but the programmes get aired on the BBC. He is opinionated and bombastic, but has a real eye and appreciation for the quirky and the disregarded/under rated (such as Hanseatic architecture).

  5. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #16 – Celle and Bremen | Aussie in France

  6. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #14 – Shades of Gaudi on the Elbe: Hundertwasser | Aussie in France

  7. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #6 – Bastei Rocks, Honigstein and over the border to Czech Republic | Aussie in France

  8. Pingback: Cycling in Germany # 3 – Cochem to Zell on the Moselle | Aussie in France

  9. Pingback: Cycling along the Danube – the Weltenburg Narrows | Aussie in France

  10. Pingback: Cycling on the Danube – Sigmaringen to Beuron | Aussie in France

  11. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #5 – Bad Schandau to Pirna along the Elbe | Aussie in France

  12. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #2 – Rhine from St Goar to Lorch | Aussie in France

  13. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #8 : Dresden Neustadt – Kunsthof Passage, Pfund’s Molkerei, a broom shop &  trompe l’oeil | Aussie in France

  14. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #20 – Trier and the Binoculars Scare | Aussie in France

  15. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #19 – Bernkastel on the Moselle – a hidden treasure | Aussie in France

  16. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #17 – Windmills and Dykes | Aussie in France

  17. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #7 – Dresden: Accommodation & Car Trouble and Baroque Treasure | Aussie in France

  18. Pingback: Cycling in Germany – Tips & Tricks | Aussie in France

  19. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #11 – Martin Luther Country: Torgau | Aussie in France

  20. Pingback:  Cycling in Germany #13: Wörlitz Gardens and the beginning of German Neo-classicism | Aussie in France

  21. Pingback: Cycling along the Danube – a Renaissance Festival in Neuburg, Bavaria | Aussie in France

  22. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #4 – Koblenz where the Moselle meets the Rhine | Aussie in France

  23. Pingback: Cycling along the Danube – Ehingen to Ulm | Aussie in France

  24. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #12 – Luther Country : Wittenberg | Aussie in France

  25. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #10: Meissen | Aussie in France

  26. Pingback: Cycling on the Danube in Germany – Binzwangen to Mengen including Zwiefalten | Aussie in France

  27. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #18 – Painted façades from Hann Münden to Höxter | Aussie in France

  28. Pingback: Cycling along the Danube – Regensburg and the Altmuhle | Aussie in France

  29. Pingback: Cycling along the Danube – Watch out for trains! | Aussie in France

  30. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #9 – Country Roads around Niederlommatzsch on the Elbe | Aussie in France

  31. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #1 – Kobern Gondorf | Aussie in France

  32. Pingback: Cycling along the Neckar in Germany #2 – Horb – Rottenburg – Türbingen – Bebenhausen | Aussie in France

  33. Pingback: Cycling along the Romantic Road in Bavaria # 4 – Augsburg | Aussie in France

  34. Pingback: Cycling on the Romantic Road in Bavaria #2 – Lechbruck to Fussen via Neuschwanstein Castle | Aussie in France

  35. Pingback: Cycling along the Neckar in Germany #3 – Rottweil to Oberndorf | Aussie in France

  36. Pingback: Cycling along the Romantic Road in Bavaria #7 – Würzburg | Aussie in France

  37. Pingback: Cycling Along the Neckar in Germany – #1 – Ludwigsburg | Aussie in France

  38. Pingback: Cycling along the Romantic Road in Bavaria #6 – Rothenburg am der Tauber and Tauberbishofsheim | Aussie in France

  39. Pingback: Cycling on the Romantic Road in Bavaria #3 Peiting to Diessen | Aussie in France

  40. Pingback: Cycling along the Romantic Road in Bavaria #1 – Peiting to Wies | Aussie in France

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *