Cycling in Germany – Tips & Tricks

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We have now been on four cycling trips to Germany, first on the Rhine near Lake Constance, second along the Danube from its source to Budapest,  third on the Moselle, Rhine, Elbe and Eiser Rivers through former East Germany and north-west Germany and fourth along the Romantic Road in Bavaria and the Neckar Valley. My preference goes to the Rhine and Danube for various reasons. Here are my suggestions and conclusions which mainly concern people who do not speak more than very basic German.

Meissen from the bike path - the best way to discover a town!

Meissen from the bike path – the best way to discover a town!

BIKE PATHS

In our experience so far, Germany is the country that offers the most possibilities to cyclists, not only in small and large cities but also in country areas. Bike routes are usually well signposted and cyclists are well-respected by motorists. They are mostly dedicated routes often separated from car traffic by a low concrete wall.

CYCLING MAPS

Bikeline, Kompass, Bergstrasse, Public Press and the ADFC all have excellent detailed maps and plasticised guidebooks, but only a couple are available in English which means that you lose a lot of the information. The German versions can be found in most tourist offices and bookshops. In some cities such as Bremen, there are Radstations which have a large collection on sale. However, it is best to order the English versions on-line. The local tourist offices often have free maps of cycling paths in their area.

Rhein-Radweg 2 Radwander Karte www.schwalbe.com

Rhein-Radweg 2 Radwander Karte www.schwalbe.com

ACCOMMODATION

First, a note on what we are looking for: a good bed, a clean, quiet, reasonably spacious room, a good shower, a balcony or terrace, and if not a lounge corner with two chairs and a table, a good wifi connection, attractive but not luxurious furniture and furnishings, blackout curtains, easy parking and pleasant surroundings. Also, a good breakfast when it’s not a self-catering flat. We don’t need a TV or hi-fi equipment, toiletries or even a hair dryer. If possible, we like an electric jug. If staying in a town, we like to be in the centre so that we can walk everywhere as most town centres are pedestrian-only. A garage for our bikes can be useful.

The Bikeline and Public Press maps have accommodation suggestions, especially along the Danube. We often rode past signs for zimmer (B&Bs) and ferienwohnung (holiday flats) but were rarely able to obtain any lists that indicated facilities and prices. We did not want to knock on someone’s door, have them show us the room, then refuse. In the end, we preferred using booking.com which has two types of bookings: either your accommodation is guaranteed up until 6 pm and you don’t give need a credit card, or it is non-refundable usually with a special offer using your credit card. We also used www.hotel.de but one of my bookings wasn’t registered.

The Rad-Haus hotel

The Rad-Haus hotel

We found that you can usually book the night before unless it’s a weekend or a very popular venue (watch out for local events especially in summer) but we often had to spend a couple of hours searching with no real guarantee of results. In general, former West Germany offers more spacious and comfortable accommodation than former East Germany.

Our budget is 60 to 100 euros a night. The only time we went over that amount we were disappointed in the accommodation but it was a very touristy area.

LUGGAGE

We travel by car with a Thule bike rack that enables our bikes to be attached in such a way that they can’t be stolen (or stripped). We choose a half-way point where we stay 2 to 4 nights, fanning out in each direction, sometimes doing a loop, sometimes returning along the same route and sometimes taking the train back. As a result, we do not have to worry about luggage. On the Danube, special rad hotels, such as the Draxler, will take your bags from one place to the next for a fee but I imagine it would have to be organised beforehand.

Our bikes on our Thule bike rack which enables you to open the boot of the car with the bikes attached

Our bikes on our Thule bike rack which enables you to open the boot of the car with the bikes attached

WEATHER

The reason we go by car is that it means we can follow the good weather as we don’t like cycling in the rain! We choose mid-June to mid-July to avoid the crowds and benefit from the very long twilight. If it’s too hot, we can avoid being out in the midday sun and if the mornings are still a little chilly we can sleep late. An occasional rainy day gives us well-needed R&R.

MEALS

We try to alternate staying in B&Bs, hotels and flats. Most places offer a fairly copious breakfast, particularly if you like cold cuts (which we don’t). The buffet always includes bread, boiled eggs, cheese, cold cuts, fruit, sometimes yoghurt and juice, often tomatoes and cucumber. You can often ask for a fried egg (spiegel ei).

Most restaurants have bike stands. This one is next to the ferry.

Most restaurants have bike stands. This one is next to a bike ferry across the Elb.

Except on our twice-weekly intermittent fast days when we don’t have breakfast and have a picnic lunch, we eat in a local restaurant in the middle of the day. The food is fairly standard with a lot of pork and potatoes, usually served with a side salad. We have a glass of wine each and the bill is usually between 20 and 40 euros.

We have a car fridge that we can plug into a wall socket in our room if there is no mini-bar, so at night,  we usually have a picnic on the balcony of our room, consisting of raw vegetables such as tomatoes, cucumber, baby peppers, carrots and asparagus, in addition to cheese or smoked salmon, bread and fruit. We usually have a glass of wine with pistachios first.

CLOTHING

We have now discovered the perfect solution to the clothing and washing problem. We have found several brands of clothing in France and Germany that are specially designed and made to keep you dry and eliminate smells (Fusalp, Columbia, Wolfskin). You can easily wash them out at night and they are usually dry by morning. We make do with two pairs of ¾ pants and 4 shirts each without having to resort to the usual multi-coloured lycra cycling outfits worn by the cyclists in the photo above. I can highly recommend them despite the price (watch out for end-of-season sales). They are extremely comfortable and never stick to your body. They don’t look like cycling clothes so you can wear them when not cycling as well. We were able to wear the pants 2 or 3 days in a row and the shirts twice without any smells at all. We have long-sleeved “overshirts” in the same material.

I'm wearing a Columbia sun protection, keep-dry, quick drying shirt and my Experience France by Bike cap

I’m wearing a Columbia sun protection, keep-dry, quick drying shirt and my Experience France by Bike cap. Although I don’t usually wearing a cord on my sunglasses, I do when cycling. Photosun are the most practical.

I also use a “mechanical” washing machine I once read about in a book by Steinbeck called Travels with Charley. You need a small plastic rubbish bin with a secure lid. You add water, washing powder (buy the special travelling sort in a tube) and a couple of shirts and underwear and put it in the boot of the car. When you arrive at your destination, you rinse the clothes and hang them on hangers in the shower to drip. If they are not completely dry next morning, you can either hang them in the car or in the wardrobe. It is an extremely efficient method!

CASH AND CREDIT CARDS

We only have Visa cards which were often not accepted so we had to juggle with having enough cash to pay for accommodation and meals. Maestro seemed to be more widely accepted.

CYCLING DISTANCES

We usually cycle 40 to 60 kilometers a day, taking frequent breaks to visit or have refreshments. Many of the riverside paths are flat, which is good on the knees and bad on the rear end. Make sure you have been cycling regularly before you go. Due to bad spring weather on one occasion, we hadn’t done much cycling and I was saddlesore for two weeks. Take some nappy rash cream with you!

The bike paths sometimes have steps with bike wheel runners

The bike paths sometimes have steps with bike wheel runners

BIKE EQUIPMENT

We each have a front bag with a Click Fix attachment and map holders. Jean Michel’s bag contains a full repair kit while I carry the first aid kit as well as our personal effects and a bike pump each. We also have a distance recorder and I have an iphone stand.

Jean Michel has two different-sized map holders, one that is attached to the handle bar bag by Velcro and the other attached to the handle bars by Velcro loops

Jean Michel has two different-sized map holders, one that is attached to the handle bar bag by Velcro and the other attached to the handle bars by Velcro loops. He is wearing a Fusalp breathable shirt.

We then have expandable saddle bags that slide onto the bike rack, containing a long-sleeved shirt, a windcheater, a poncho and plastic trousers depending on the weather. We also carry sunscreen, biscuits and mosquito repellent. The poncho isn’t ideal but we haven’t found anything better. We use ½ litre plastic Evian-type water bottles with screw tops that we refrigerate overnight and put in stubby coolers inside the side pouches.

Jean Michel on a ferry on the Danube. You can see the saddle bag and front bag. The photo was taken last year before we bought our special outdoor wear.

Jean Michel on a ferry on the Danube. You can see the saddle bag and front bag. The photo was taken last year before we bought our special outdoor wear.

We don’t wear helmets which are not compulsory in Europe but we always wear caps and use sunscreen. We wear MEINDL and TEVA walking sandals that seem to last forever, because we like to alternate cycling and visiting. If it’s a little frisky, you can add socks and look very German!

When it's chilly, socks and a windcheater do the trick.

When it’s chilly, socks and a windcheater do the trick. I’m wearing Fuaslp lycra outdoor 3/4 pants.

FERRIES

In Germany, ferries that take people, bikes and sometimes cars across the river are very popular. They usually cost 1 or 2 euros per person with a bike. There is no set schedule. The ferryman crosses when there are enough people. Sometimes there is an intercom you can press if there is no one in sight. The car ferries are usually cable-operated while the people/bike ferries can also be motorised. Bridges don’t always have a dedicated bike lane.

Cable and winch system on the car ferry

Cable and winch system on the car ferry

You can read more about our cycling intineraries in Germany, France and other European destinations by entering “Cycling in Germany” or “Danube”, “Elb”, “Rhine”, “Moselle”, etc. in the search box. Another excellent source of information is the Bicycle Germany website. Below is some useful vocab. I’d love to hear about your own experience or answer any questions you may have. Happy cycling!

CYCLIST’S VOCAB

Rad, Farhhad – bike
Radweg – bike route
Radler – cyclist
Radfarher – cyclist
Radfarhen – to bike/cycle
Radtour, Radfahrt – bike ride
Radhotel – hotel that especially caters to cyclists
Fahrrad absteigen – get off your bike
Zimmer – B&B (literally means bedroom)
Ferienwohnung – holiday flat
Färhe – ferry
 

OTHER POSTS ABOUT CYCLING IN GERMANY

Cycling in Germany – Tips & Tricks
 
Cycling in Germany #1 – Kobern-Kondorf on the Moselle
Cycling in Germany #2 – Rhine from Saint Goar to Lorch
Cycling in Germany #3 – Cochem to Zell on the Moselle
Cycling in Germany #4 – Koblenz where the Moselle meets the Rhine
Cycling in Germany #5 – Bad Schaugen to Pirna along the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #6 – Bastei Rocks, Honigen and over the border to Czech Republic 
Cycling in Germany #7 – Dresden: accommodation & car trouble and Baroque Treasure  
Cycling in Germany #8 – Dresden Neustadt: Kunsthof Passage, Pfund’s Molkerei, a broom shop & trompe l’oeil
Cycling in Germany #9 – Country roads around Niderlommatzsch on the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #10 – Meissen on the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #11 – Martin Luther Country: Torgau on the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #12 – Martin Luther Country: Wittenberg on the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #13 – Wörlitz Gardens and the beginning of neo-classicism in Germany
Cycling in Germany #14 – Shades of Gaudi on the Elbe: Hundertwasser
Cycling in Germany #15 –  Turgermünde, the prettiest village on the Elbe
Cycling in Germany #16 – Celle & Bremen
Cycling in Germany #17 – Windmills & Dykes
Cycling in Germany #18 – Painted façades from Hann. Münden to Höxter
Cycling in Germany #19 – Bernkastel on the Moselle: a hidden treasure
Cycling in Germany #20 – Trier & the Binoculars Scare
 
Cycling along the Danube – A Renaissance festival in Neuburg, Bavaria
Cycling along the Danube – Watch out for trains!
Cycling along the Danube – Regensburg & Altmuhle
Cycling along the Danube –  The Weltenburg Narrows
Cycling along the Danube – from its source to Ehingen
Cycling along the Danube – Ehingen to Ulm
Cycling along the Danube – Singmarigen to Beuron
Cycling along the Danube – Binzwangen to Mengen including  Zwiefalten
 
Eurovelo 6 – Cycling around Lake Constance
Eurovelo 6 – Moos to Stein am Rhein and Steckborn on Lake Constance
 
Heading home to France after a month’s cycling holiday
 
Cycling along the Neckar in Germany #1 – Ludwigsburg
Cycling alnog the Neckar in Germany #2 – Horb – Rottenburg – Türbingen – Bebenhausen 
Cycling along the Neckar in Germany #3 – Rottweil to Oberndorf
 
Cycling along the Romantic Road in Bavaria #1 – Peiting to Wies
Cycling along the Romantic Road in Bavaria #2 – Lechbruck to Fussen via Neuschwanstein Castle
Cycling along the Romantic Road in Bavaria #3 – Peiting to Diessen
Cycling along the Romantic Road in Bavaria #4 – Augsburg 
Cycling along the Romantic Road in Bavaria #5 – Nordlingen, Wallerstein, Dinkelsbühl and Feuchtwangen
Cycling along the Romantic Road in Bavaria #6 – Rothenburg am der Tauber and Tauberbishofsheim
Cycling along the Romantic Road in Bavaria #7 – Würzburg
Cycling along the Romantic Road in Bavaria #8 – Tauberbishofsheim to Creglingen
 
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56 Responses to Cycling in Germany – Tips & Tricks

  1. Tricia says:

    I’ve been enjoying your holiday through Germany. The pictures are wonderful, whether the countryside or the magnificent old buildings. Certainly nothing like those castles etc back in Oz! Thanks for sharing.

  2. Michael Williams says:

    Thirty-eight years ago, for our honeymoon, we took our bikes to Europe and toured for nine weeks. We had a wonderful time. The two of you are an inspiration to do it again. Thanks for all the information and photos

    • Rosemary Kneipp says:

      I shall look forward to hearing all about it! We’ve now cycled in France, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Hungary, Italy, Croatia and Slovenia. The Netherlands and maybe Romania are next on the list.

  3. Great tips, Rosemary. As you know, we recently did a short cycle along the Danube based on your post from your Austrian bike ride last year. Love your washing machine suggestion – I’ll have to try it out!

  4. Excellent travel tips, and beautiful pics!

  5. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #20 – Trier and the Binoculars Scare | Aussie in France

  6. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #8 : Dresden Neustadt – Kunsthof Passage, Pfund’s Molkerei, a broom shop &  trompe l’oeil | Aussie in France

  7. Pingback: Cycling along the Danube – a Renaissance Festival in Neuburg, Bavaria | Aussie in France

  8. Pingback: Cycling along the Danube – Regensburg and the Altmuhle | Aussie in France

  9. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #4 – Koblenz where the Moselle meets the Rhine | Aussie in France

  10. Pingback: Cyclng in Germany #15 – Turgermünde, the prettiest village on the Elbe | Aussie in France

  11. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #19 – Bernkastel on the Moselle – a hidden treasure | Aussie in France

  12. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #1 – Kobern Gondorf | Aussie in France

  13. Pingback: Cycling on the Danube in Germany – Binzwangen to Mengen including Zwiefalten | Aussie in France

  14. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #17 – Windmills and Dykes | Aussie in France

  15. Pingback: Cycling along the Danube – the Weltenburg Narrows | Aussie in France

  16. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #18 – Painted façades from Hann Münden to Höxter | Aussie in France

  17. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #9 – Country Roads around Niederlommatzsch on the Elbe | Aussie in France

  18. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #5 – Bad Schandau to Pirna along the Elbe | Aussie in France

  19. Pingback: Cycling in Germany # 3 – Cochem to Zell on the Moselle | Aussie in France

  20. Pingback: Cycling along the Danube – Ehingen to Ulm | Aussie in France

  21. Pingback: Cycling along the Danube – Watch out for trains! | Aussie in France

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  23. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #7 – Dresden: Accommodation & Car Trouble and Baroque Treasure | Aussie in France

  24. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #10: Meissen | Aussie in France

  25. Pingback:  Cycling in Germany #13: Wörlitz Gardens and the beginning of German Neo-classicism | Aussie in France

  26. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #2 – Rhine from St Goar to Lorch | Aussie in France

  27. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #14 – Shades of Gaudi on the Elbe: Hundertwasser | Aussie in France

  28. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #11 – Martin Luther Country: Torgau | Aussie in France

  29. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #6 – Bastei Rocks, Honigstein and over the border to Czech Republic | Aussie in France

  30. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #12 – Luther Country : Wittenberg | Aussie in France

  31. Pingback: Cycling in Germany #16 – Celle and Bremen | Aussie in France

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  36. Micah Calip says:

    Great blog and great tips, fellow biker!

    However I wish to ask the specific brands of clothing you found that would be recommendable since washing has always been my problem and I haven’t found any brand that dries easily and doesn’t smell. -___-

    This is amazing. Thank you

    • Rosemary Kneipp says:

      Hi, we like Wolfskin, Salewa and Columbia all dry overnight and don’t smell. They also look like regular clothing and not bikewear.

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  38. Helen says:

    This is just so useful! I would love a cycling holiday but I couldn’t take the saddlesore. I’ll just have to stick to hiking.
    Helen recently posted…Climbing Mt Warning – 1156 mMy Profile

  39. Pingback: Cycling along the Neckar in Germany #3 – Rottweil to Oberndorf | Aussie in France

  40. Pingback: Cycling Along the Neckar in Germany – #1 – Ludwigsburg | Aussie in France

  41. Pingback: Cycling along the Romantic Road in Bavaria # 4 – Augsburg | Aussie in France

  42. Pingback: Cycling along the Romantic Road in Bavaria 5#– Nordlingen, Wallerstein, Dinkelsbühl and Feuchtwangen | Aussie in France

  43. Pingback: Cycling along the Neckar in Germany #2 – Horb – Rottenburg – Türbingen – Bebenhausen | Aussie in France

  44. Pingback: Cycling along the Romantic Road in Bavaria #7 – Würzburg | Aussie in France

  45. I am SO not a cyclist, so I totally need to read this! Thanks for all the great tips!

  46. Pingback: Cycling along the Romantic Road in Bavaria #6 – Rothenburg am der Tauber and Tauberbishofsheim | Aussie in France

  47. Pingback: Cycling on the Romantic Road in Bavaria #3 Peiting to Diessen | Aussie in France

  48. Thanks for sharing such a great post.
    Dennis L. Ward recently posted…Best BMX Bikes( 2017) | Reviews & GuideMy Profile

  49. Pingback: Cycling along the Romantic Road in Bavaria #8 – Tauberbishofsheim to Creglingen | Aussie in France

  50. Pingback: Cycling on the Romantic Road in Bavaria #2 – Lechbruck to Fussen via Neuschwanstein Castle | Aussie in France

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